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Race Archives

2015 Honolulu


Race News

 

Aarhus, Denmark – At the Yacht Racing Forum held this year in Aarhus, Denmark, the inaugural Mirabaud Sailing Video Awards were announced, and Chris Love Production’s highlight video “The Fleet is Away” from the 2017 Transpac won the Public Award category. With a theme similar to “Optimism,” the overall award-winning video from Cocoon Production in Switzerland, Love’s Transpac video highlighted the future of offshore sailing in the inspiration it brings to youth who want to take on the adventures being enjoyed now by adults.

Out of 44 videos submitted by professional videographers and producers, The Fleet is Away received the highest score of 8.22 based on a 1-10 scale in online voting, receiving 1307 votes.

This video and others in the Mirabaud contest can be seen at this link: www.sailingvideoaward.com/videos-pros/transpac-2017-the-fleet-is-away.html.


The Transpacific Yacht Club decision opens eligibility to a wider array of first-to-finish contenders and is consistent with similar limits used by other races around the world - now IMOCA 60's, Volvo 70's, canting maxi's and even foiling boats are invited to race for this classic Transpac race trophy.


Saturday, November 4, 2017
5:00 pm  No Host Cocktails
6:00 pm  Live Polynesian Show, followed by dinner & meeting

Long Beach Yacht Club
$75/person

ONLINE DINNER RESERVATIONS >>

(or download flyer to print and mail in your reservation with a check)

The Biennial Meeting of the Transpacific Yacht Club will be held on Saturday, November 4, 2017 at the Long Beach Yacht Club located at 6201 East Appian Way, Long Beach, California.

No-Host Cocktails will start at 5:00pm with live Polynesian Show at 6:00pm, and a Dinner and the Meeting immediately following. Tickets are $75 per person, guests are invited. Reservations are required and must be received by October 28th.

Assorted Appetizers, LBYC House Salad, “Baseball” Steak with garlic mashed potatoes and fresh vegetables, warm Apple Crisp a la mode

The primary business to be conducted at the meeting will be the election and installation of Officers and Directors for 2018-2019.

We only get together every two years and this a great time to renew friendships from past races. Please join all of your fellow members at this great dinner, including live Polynesian dance entertainment and an exciting 2017 race recap video. A very fun evening is guaranteed!


For the 49th edition of the Transpacific YC’s biennial 2225-mile race from LA to Honolulu, “normal” weather conditions returned to the North Pacific course area after the previous two races having been affected by unusual patterns associated with El Nino. The compression of the three start dates into four days rather than six was also meant to minimize the impact of the fleet possibly racing in different conditions and thus introducing a possible bias on overall corrected time trophies such as the King Kalakaua Trophy.

Unlike the previous two races, this year’s race had all classes starting in the typical Transpac race wind pattern: a westerly sea breeze to the West End of Catalina, followed by increasing breezes offshore and staying more or less at 15-20 knots the entire race. The fastest boats generally sailed in more breeze in proportion to the others since the breeze dropped slightly on the course after the first finishers in Divisions 1 and 3, hence their top finishes in the overall results.


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Blogs from the Boats

DAY 12: Shark Gazers and Alien Watch

“It ain’t no J Crew ad out there, honey.” - Elizabeth

At any given moment, a sailor can make any number of mistakes, ranging from the dangerous (grabbing a running halyard), to the humorous (Scott inflating his PFD while sliding into the nav station). Today, we discovered we’d committed mistake perfection: We’d filled Hokahey’s water tanks too high.


After some 2225 miles of ocean racing, we just about have the finish line in sight!

Well, here aboard Hula Girl we certainly had our trials and tribulations on this one. The light and difficult conditions for the first days of the race made for some really tough going. Then I got us stuck in a lane too far south where we simply didn't have the wind that our competitors to the north had. But, as strange as it may sound, as we sail for the finish line now, coming around the eastern end of Oahu into the Molokai Channel with preparations beginning for the final gybe towards Diamond Head, I don't think I would risk changing much about this race.


Hey all friends and family, just a bit overdue in getting out a report from onboard Hula Girl in the 2015 Transpac, but here we go.

So after our slow start and getting pinned in the funk- wind plagued southern lane on the way to Hawaii, we finally managed to get out and into the Trades. And man, is it nice. We have had beautiful days of great sailing in winds mostly 18- 22 knots. The squall activity has been mostly light, with the busiest night having been Friday night. But even then, the mid to high 20s what the breeziest we saw


"We protect the NORTH! Dare to come past the 33 latitude, we will find you and lee bow you!" - Groggy pit man

Glorious wind! We savored the feeling of it whipping around our ears and pushing us across the Pacific. Our northern route around Hurricane Dolores' dead zone was longer and colder, but after two days without breeze we felt like 11-yr-olds earning back Xbox privileges after a long period of confiscation. Hokahey was back.

The crew took turns at the helm, competing with each other for fastest driving time. We maneuvered the boat to surf northern swells. Spray flew across deck. Elizabeth and G4 were tied in first place for most of today, with a high speed of 13.2 knots. At dusk, JT pushed Hokahey to 13.3 knots. Just when we were about to award him Top Gun title, 19-year-old Connor surprised everyone with a speed of 14.3 knots. Not too shabby for a young scallywag, eh?


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